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Where To Recycle Electronics

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Kevin Marshall
June 19, 2020

You probably have a box or drawer in your home full of batteries, old phones, cables, media players, defunct laptops, and other recyclables. When it comes to different types of electronic waste, you may not realize that a growing number of recycling centers and organizations are available to help you get rid of old phones, electronics, and other devices in eco-friendly ways.

The truth is environmental scientists have said, "never throw old electronics away." It causes toxic chemicals and metals to be left in the soil, leading to the degradation of our planet as landfills grow higher and higher due to this waste.

So where can you go to recycle this e-waste? These resources can surely help you find the nearest e-waste recycling center or check out the WC Recycler Mission statement.

WHERE TO RECYCLE ELECTRONICS‍

A man placing electronics inside a recycling box.

If you have too many boxes and shelves filled with electronics never used, then it's time to get rid of them. You can search Capital Scrap Metal even to gain some money back from old wires, as well as a site called InvestmentMine. These sites will pay you for old cables in some cases, especially if they contain copper, which goes for about $2.35 per pound.

These are some other places to go to for e-waste recycling:

1. DROP-OFF AT STORES‍

Several stores are willing to take old electronics, batteries, wires, and other devices for recycling. Here are a few:

  1. Best Buy
  2. Whole Foods
  3. Lowes
  4. Staples
  5. Home Depot

Need to know where to recycle electronics within the store? Not all locations may have e-waste bins. It's best to call ahead or check online where these drop-off centers are located, but associates should be able to point you in the right direction, too.

2. TRY EARTH911 OR CALL2RECYCLE‍

This helpful website helps you find the nearest recycling center, but it's mostly for batteries. You'll provide information on whether the battery is alkaline, lithium, zinc-air, or button cell.

3. MICROSOFT'S REGISTERED REFURBISHER DIRECTORY‍

Zoomed hands fixing a laptop.

In the case of old desktops and laptops, you may be able to refurbish a laptop less than five years old. If so, you could donate these to non-profits, libraries, and schools. There are many programs listed under Microsoft's Registered Refurbisher Directory.

In other cases, Earth911 has a laptop recycling finder, or you could try Dell's Reconnect Program, which also accepts broken and decrepit computer hardware for recycling or refurbishing.

4. CHECK EPA'S CERTIFIED ELECTRONICS RECYCLERS SITE‍

In addition to learning about recycling centers, you can also check to see if they are legitimate and reputable e-waste recycling businesses.

5. EARN TAX BREAKS‍

For recycling your old devices and e-waste, you could earn a tax break, according to Sage Bluebook. These are mentioned in the Federal Income Tax Code under Section 170. While old computers may not be worth much, they can get you a nice tax deduction.


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